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ocean_acidification

Ocean Acidification

Carbon Dioxide ( CO2 ) that goes into the atmosphere doesn't always stay there. When the CO2 is greater than historic levels, it will mean that the unbalance between CO2 in the atmosphere and CO2 in the oceans will be such that the oceans will absorb more CO2 until things come back into balance.

This balancing first happens at the surface of the ocean. Then, the ocean currents take the more acidic water and mix it down to deeper levels and bring up fresher water, which continues the absorption of CO2. Measurements of this absorption into different ocean layers has seemed to say that the mixing doesn't always happen at the same rates, and scientists have been surprised by the changing rates of absorption.

When the oceans have absorbed a surprising amount of CO2, the amount left in the atmosphere has been lower than expected.

Dissolved CO2 becomes carbolic acid, which increases the acidity of the oceans. Increased acidity is an important and problematic change because much sea life has exoskeletons. That means that their “bones” are their shells, which are made, like all bones, with lots of calcium. So, increasing ocean acidity gives sea life something like osteoporosis – i.e. calcium deficiency in their shell creation. For this situation, that problem starts at birth.

Numbers, Graphs, History

TBD

Oregon Article by Rep. Bonamici

Oregon and Washington state researchers have discovered that Oyster “seed” cannot live and grow when the ocean acidity is high. Thanks to the fact that ocean currents are not constant, but come in waves, fresher water is made available to our coasts for stretches of time that can be measured and somewhat predicted and (until the oceans get more acidic) allows Oyster seed to be put out in oyster beds at the right times. When these oysters get large enough, they can outlast the acid times and grow successfully. Their shells probably do most of their growing during the less acid times.

It is not clear how long the oceans can continue to support oyster growth, considering that there is ever increasing CO2 available for absorption into the oceans.

This is not just an oyster problem. Most small animal life of the oceans have exoskeletons. The life of this planet is absolutely dependent on the ongoing success of small plant and animal life of the oceans…

It is heartening to see that Representative Susanne Bonamici understands this issue:

  • YouTube by Rep Bonomici on Ocean Acidity
  • Flipboard An excellent aggregation of many different sources on ocean acidification.
  • article Nearshore waters of the California Current System (California CS) already have a low carbonate saturation state, making them particularly susceptible to ocean acidification. … Habitats along the sea floor will become exposed to year-round undersaturation within the next 20 to 30 years. These projected events have potentially major implications for the rich and diverse ecosystem that characterizes the California CS.

Numbers, Graphs, History

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Oregon Article by Rep. Bonamici

Oregon and Washington state researchers have discovered that Oyster “seed” cannot live and grow when the ocean acidity is high. Thanks to the fact that ocean currents are not constant, but come in waves, fresher water is made available to our coasts for stretches of time that can be measured and somewhat predicted and (until the oceans get more acidic) allows Oyster seed to be put out in oyster beds at the right times. When these oysters get large enough, they can outlast the acid times and grow successfully. Their shells probably do most of their growing during the less acid times.

It is not clear how long the oceans can continue to support oyster growth, considering that there is ever increasing CO2 available for absorption into the oceans.

This is not just an oyster problem. Most small animal life of the oceans have exoskeletons. The life of this planet is absolutely dependent on the ongoing success of small plant and animal life of the oceans…

It is heartening to see that Representative Susanne Bonamici understands this issue:

  • Flipboard An excellent aggregation of many different sources on ocean acidification.
  • article Nearshore waters of the California Current System (California CS) already have a low carbonate saturation state, making them particularly susceptible to ocean acidification. … Habitats along the sea floor will become exposed to year-round undersaturation within the next 20 to 30 years. These projected events have potentially major implications for the rich and diverse ecosystem that characterizes the California CS.

Oregon ....

The Oregon universities have been involved in the research of ocean acidification, especially with respect to oyster and shrimp production. Hopefully, some of the references can be gathered into this spot.

Bill that almost passed? in 2017 session. May get another chance in short 2018 session? OR SB276

text SB276

ORLIS page SB276

ocean_acidification.txt · Last modified: 2017/07/24 00:55 by admin